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Coffee and cigarettes no more.

First, you smoked in the coffee shop. Then you smoked in a special section of the coffee shop. Now, you smoke on the street outside. Soon, you won't be able to smoke there either.

Starbucks has announced that it will ban smoking within 25 feet of its stores in the U.S. and Canada where local law permits it, the Guardian reports, barring yet another area of public space to smokers.

Many cities now prohibit smoking in parks and on beaches and allow private building owners to enact their own outdoor smoking restrictions, while some universities have taken a more thorough approach to policing their outdoor areas. But Starbucks' effort could have a unique impact: the chain has over 14,000 locations in the U.S. and Canada.

Top image: Bob Orsillo / Shutterstock.com

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