Reuters

He had visited the Market Street demolition site several times in the last few months and had declared it safe.

The man responsible for inspecting the Philadelphia construction site where a building collapse killed six people last week, reportedly committed suicide yesterday. According to NBC Philadelphia, the unidentified man shot himself inside a pickup truck near his home in the Philly neighborhood of Roxborough. Police sources said he had inspected the Market Street building several times in the last few months, as it was in the process of being torn down and had declared the construction site safe, even after receiving a complaint about conditions at the building in May. 

One week ago, the outer walls of the building unexpectedly collapsed, destroying a Salvation Army Thrift Store located next door, and killing six people inside. Thirteen others were buried under the rubble and later rescued.

The construction worker who was operating a large excavation machine at site was arrested last weekend and charged with involuntary manslaughter for his actions before the collapse. Kane Robert has a long history of drug arrests and convictions, and was found to have marijuana and prescription drugs in his system just hours after the collapse. He is still being held in jail on more than $1 million bail. There is no word on if the inspector was also facing an investigation or criminal charges.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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