Yes we cat!

If virtual support made a sound, you'd hear a lion's roar emanating from the small Mexican city of Xalapa, where a cat named Morris is running for mayor.

Morris (pronounced like Maurice) has become something of an international celebrity of late, as his farcical campaign for the mayoralty picks up steam. His slogan? "Tired of voting for rats? Vote for a cat!"

With over 100,000 Facebook likes, el candigato is at least five times more popular than Xalapa's human candidates. And by setting the bar low, his handlers, a pair of local students, have promised that if elected, he will live up to his promises: to sleep, eat, yawn and play in the dirt.

Here's a video of Morris giving his opinion about various subjects in Mexican politics. As you can see, he's a bombastic fellow:

The election is on July 7th. Morris is not currently allowed on the ballot, because he's a cat.

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