Mohamed Morsi has been officially replaced by the head of the constitutional court.

Egypt swore in an acting leader on Thursday after the army removed President Mohamed Morsi Wednesday following massive protests in Cairo.

Morsi, the first president of the country to be democratically elected, was replaced by Adli Mansour, the head of the country's Supreme Constitutional Court. The New York Times reports:

In his first reported remarks, he praised the protesters whose mass demonstrations spurred the military action, calling them a unifying force and saying they "corrected the path of its glorious revolution."

But he also held out an olive branch to Mr. Morsi’s Islamist supporters in the Muslim Brotherhood, saying the group "is part of this people and are invited to participate in building the nation as nobody will be excluded, and if they responded to the invitation, they will be welcomed," Reuters reported.

Below, scenes from Cairo via Reuters:

Adli Mansour speaks at his swearing in ceremony on July 4. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters)
A member of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi holds a copy of the Koran while shouting slogans during the swearing in ceremony on July 4. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters)
Egyptian military jets fly over Cairo as Adli Mansour is sworn in on July 4. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)
Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi hold posters of him as they shout slogans at the Raba El-Adwyia mosque square on July 4. (Louafi Larbi/Reuters)
Protesters against Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi set off fireworks in Tahrir Square on July 3. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

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