Rueters

His favorability has plummeted, along with his chances of winning the primary in the mayoral election.

The first poll conducted entirely after the new revelations regarding Anthony Weiner's online interests has bad news for the former Congressmember: His favorability has plummeted, along with his chances of winning the primary in the New York City mayoral election.

Conducted for NBC New York and the Wall Street Journal, the poll shows Weiner's on-going rival Christine Quinn, the speaker of the City Council, with a healthy lead among Democrats. More than a quarter back Quinn, only 16 percent support Weiner — a figure that has him in a statistical tie with two other candidates. Considering only those voters most likely to actually vote, Weiner drops into third behind Public Advocate Bill DeBlasio.

But words don't do it justice. Here's how polling in the race has fared since earlier this month, according to four polls. (The four: 1, 2, 3, 4.)

7/17/20137/17/20137/19/20137/19/20137/21/20137/21/20137/23/20137/23/2013101020203030percent supportpercent supportQuinnQuinnWeinerWeinerThompsonThompsonDeBlasioDeBlasioLiuLiu


In case you were wondering if that drop was simply a function of shifts in poll methodology (see this post), it isn't. Here's how Weiner's approval has fared over the course of the year. Last month he was pretty popular! This month, on a poll conducted in its entirety yesterday, he isn't.

FebruaryFebruaryAprilAprilMayMayJuneJuneJulyJuly303040405050FavorableFavorableUnfavorableUnfavorable


In fact, as NBC News reports, the poll "also found that 46 percent of Democrats said the sexting scandal mattered a great deal or a good amount to them when it came to deciding who to support."

In a press conference earlier today, Weiner reiterated that he planned to stay in the race. A poll released yesterday by Quinnipiac — which didn't show nearly as big a drop for Weiner since it began before the new revelations — found that Weiner would also fare poorly if he made it to a run-off. (If no candidate in the primary gets 50 percent, a run-off ensues.) In other words, Weiner staying in the race is an act of hope, not confidence. And dramatic things can happen over the course of campaigns! Just ask Anthony Weiner.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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