Reuters

But will it be enough to quell demands that he step down?

On the heels of four more women coming forward Thursday to accuse San Diego Mayor Bob Filner of unwanted sexual advances, the mayor held a decidedly awkward press conference Friday to announce that he will enter a rehab facility to address his behavior.

"Beginning on August 5, I will be entering a behavior counseling clinic to undergo two weeks of intensive therapy," Filner said.

"The behavior I have engaged in over many years is wrong," said the former congressman. "I must become a better person."

But will entering rehab really be enough to to silence his critics? Top Democratic party officials in San Diego County have been calling for his resignation all morning, as has a majority of the city council. The 70-year-old mayor has been under fire for the better part of a month, after several women, include the city's former chief operating officer, accused the mayor of unwanted sexual advances and inappropriate behavior. Among the racier allegations? The mayor's former press secretary has alleged that Filner once asked her to "get naked" and kiss him, and, another time, asked her to work without wearing panties.

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