Shubert Ciencia (bigberto on Flickr)

Splatters were found in the National Cathedral and on the Joseph Henry Statue today, and a suspect has been arrested.

Before the green paint found on the Lincoln Memorial last week had even been removed, Washington's paint vandal struck again, hitting two other major landmarks.  

Earlier this afternoon, wet green paint was found on an organ in the Bethlehem Chapel at the National Cathedral, which is now closed for investigation. According to NBC Washington, the U.S. Park Police were notified this morning that the Joseph Henry Statue across from the Smithsonian castle had also been defaced.

So far, no connection has been made between these cases and the Lincoln Memorial incident last week. However, more information should surface soon, as the Associated Press has just reported that a suspect has just been arrested for the vandalism case at the National Cathedral.

(h/t Washington City Paper)

Top image by Shubert Ciencia on Flickr

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