Reuters

You can't blame Danny Kedem, a Hillary Clinton presidential campaign veteran, for not going down with the ship.

The latest revelations about Anthony Weiner's habit of exchanging sexy messages with young women have hit where it really hurts. According to a report from The New York Times, Weiner's campaign manager resigned this weekend because it was all too much to handle. 

Danny Kedem, the 31-year-old Hillary Clinton presidential campaign veteran, informed Weiner that he was abandoning ship within the last 24 hours, the Times' Michael Barbaro and Michael Grynbaum report. Of course, no one is blaming Kedem after the week this campaign went through. Weiner stood beside his wife, Huma Abedin, and admitted sending more pictures of his junk to young girls after his initial sexting scandal cost him his job in Congress. Weiner insisted on staying in the race, with Abedin's endorsement, even while editorial boards across the city and other candidates called for him to drop out. Oh, and there were so many bad jokes. To make matters worse, the at-one-point inconceivable lead in the polls that Kedem built for Weiner crumbled instantly. Weiner confirmed Kedem's resignation to local television station New York 1.

Did we mention there are more sexting partners still out there, waiting to be uncovered? 

So you can't blame the guy for not going down with Weiner's ship, but at least Kedem's decision gave us this massive Times-ian understatement: "The move suggests that even as Mr. Weiner vows to press ahead with his candidacy, there are mounting doubts about its political viability within his own campaign," Barbaro and Grynbaum write. Because this thing is headed for a disaster on election day if Weiner stays in, and we wouldn't want it any other way.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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