stockcreations/Shutterstock.com

This map of Twitter data will show you.

We Americans have strong opinions on fast food. Burger King fanboys shun McDonalds, and vice versa.

Now you can see where these fans are. The social analytics company PeekAnalytics just released a neat interactive map that charts the most talked-about burger place in a given city, based on an analysis of over nine million tweets all over the world during June. The map covers 26 restaurant companies in over 12,000 American towns and cities.

Interestingly, burger discussions don't necessarily align with where the restaurants actually are. "For example, there are a lot of people talking about In-N-Out Burger who live on the East Coast, even though there are no locations east of the Mississippi," writes PeekAnalytics CEO Michael Hussey in an email.

Are there larger implications beyond cool factor? Maybe, if you're a fast food chain exec looking to open up new places. "I think this can be useful for market research," Hussey writes. "Clearly, there are certain cities clamoring for some of these burger chains to move to their location."

 Click here for the larger version of the map.

(h/t Google Maps Mania)

Top image: stockcreations/Shutterstock.com

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