Reuters

Scenes from a city reopened.

Remember these super-sad scenes?

Well now that the government shutdown is officially over, museums, national parks and government offices are all reopening today. And we've never seen so many people quite so happy to be heading back to work. Like, literally, they're hugging on the doorsteps of the EPA:

For your shutdown hangover cure, here are some more ecstatic scenes from what is also turning out to be a great marketing moment for America's national museums (yes, this also means government Twitter accounts are back a-tweeting again):

This nice family waiting this morning in front of the National Air and Space Museum will actually get to go inside today:

Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Nearby, the Superintendent of the National Mall and Memorial Parks, Bob Vogel, welcomes a worker back:

Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

And back on Twitter, the National Zoo is getting two weeks' worth of Panda Cam news out of its system. Enjoy:

Top image of National Park Service Rangers near the Jefferson Memorial this morning: Kevin LaMarque/Reuters.

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