Associated Press

He won't face any jail time though.

Former San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who left office earlier this year under a cloud of sexual harassment claims, pled guilty to charges of felony, false imprisonment, and two misdemeanor battery counts on Tuesday, but he won't serve any prison time as part of the plea deal. 

The embattled ex-mayor resigned at the end of August after facing a wide range of sexual harassment accusations from about 20 female coworkers and associates. At the time, Filner denied his role in those allegations and called it a "lynch mob." Today, though, Filner pled guilty to the three charges, and he will serve three years of probation and undergo treatment under a mental health professional. That deal saved him from a maximum potential of five years in prison for the three charges.

Three "Jane Does" are named as victims in the cases in incidents between March and May this year. According to the accusers and the deputy attorney general, Filner restrained one woman at a fundraiser, kissed a woman without her consent at a mayoral event, and grabbed the butt of a third woman against her will.

"This conduct was not only criminal, it was also an extreme abuse of power," the state attorney general said. "This prosecution is about consequence and accountability. No one is above the law."

When Filner made a deal with San Diego to resign in August, he negotiated a settlement in which the city would cover his legal defense fees from a pending sexual harassment lawsuit. This criminal case, though, was brought on by the state and so isn't covered by that deal.

The U-T San Diego's investigative Watchdog section also notes that Filner could face separate prosecution for questionable donations from political friends:

Separately, the Watchdog has reported, federal agents have made inquiries about Filner's handling of a Kearny Mesa development by Sunroad Centrum Partners. The developer received a city concession after giving the mayor's office $100,000 for favorite Filner causes.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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