REUTERS

From Fort Sumter to Ellis Island, photos are pouring in of America's shuttered national monuments.

Well we didn't have to wait long to see the effects of the government shutdown. The Census Bureau's website is down, as is NASA's, and America's national parks and monuments are closed. Below, a tour of all the different signs popping up today telling people to go away.  

Here's Fort Sumter in South Carolina, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired.

Castle Clinton monument in New York is pretty lonely, too. In the mid-19th century, Castle Clinton was New York's first immigration processing station.

You can forget getting a tour of the U.S. Capitol!

The National Zoo? Closed. The live cams? Off. The animals? Doing what they always do (pooping, sleeping, eating).

The Great Emancipator is locked up, too.

These people are trying to see the Liberty Bell, but they can't.

Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty are also off limits. Luckily the State of Liberty is really big, so you can still like, see it.

The World War II Memorial appears to be an exception to the rule. A group of veterans have taken it over!

Top image: America is closed, go home. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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