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A resident says sous-chefs are foraging plants from his property. Sob story or masterful troll?

"How do you keep local sous-chefs from harvesting urban edibles on your property?"

That's the beginning of a desperate plea from a resident of Portland, Oregon. The full Reddit post details how the property owner could not keep sous-chefs from climbing over his six-foot fence and foraging his catmint, grape leaves, pineappleweed, and chicory leaves. Since the post went up three days ago, readers have been split: some offer helpful advice, others are crying masterful Internet troll.

Yesterday, local TV station KATU interviewed Martin Connolly, whose story corresponds with the Reddit post perfectly. Connolly, a manager of an apartment complex in Southeast Portland, says employees from trendy restaurants in the neighborhood have been picking weeds and plants from his property. His evidence? Beard nets and recipes left behind.  

"In some neighborhoods there's coyotes, some have skunks. Here, it's just sous-chefs and all the things that come with that," Connolly says.

Though he put up a "no trespassing" sign and may soon use a camera to catch the thieves in action, Connolly hasn’t called the police fearing it won’t be taken seriously. But he did have a piece of advice for the reporter, "Hide your dock, hide your mallow. No herb is safe."

About the Author

Jenny Xie
Jenny Xie

Jenny Xie is a fellow at CityLab. 

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