"If you get violated by a cop, how are you gonna trust that cop?" 

New York Police Officer Adhyl Polanco has been stopped and frisked by fellow officers who didn't know he was a cop, but it wasn't until a superior officer asked him to arrest a 13-year-old who was walking home from school that Polanco, a native of the Dominican Republic who grew up in Washington Heights, changed his mind about stop and frisk. 

"That was my turning point," Polanco says in an interview put together by Communities United for Police Reform. "That was the time I said, 'You know what? Why should I do this to a kid who is just walking home from school, that we know is not doing anything wrong?' Why should I do that? It's not what I became a cop for. This is not what I wanted to do."  

Polanco also talks about how his views on stop and frisk have evolved since the NYPD imposed quotas in 2009 that led to an all-time high of 685,724 stops in 2011

Communities United for Police Reform has also interviewed Rev. Samuel Cruz of Trinity Lutheran Church in Brooklyn:

And Kasiem Walters, a high school senior from Flatbush, Brooklyn, who's been stopped and frisked numerous times

All three interviews are worth watching. They communicate an ugly truth about stop and frisk that isn't quite captured by charts and numbers

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