"I can't do anything else but apologize."

Toronto mayor Rob Ford announced at a 4 p.m. press conference that he will still not be resigning despite confessing to using crack cocaine earlier today.

Ford added that he has "nothing left to hide" and kept his drug use a secret not only from the public but his family as well. "These mistakes will never, ever, ever happen again."

In fact, the mayor made clear he plans to run for reelection and several times referenced his love for saving taxpayers' money. He closed off by saying "God bless the people of Toronto," leading a member of the press to guffaw as the mayor walked back into his office without answering questions.

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