Reuters

Ford has just admitted using the drug to journalists inside City Hall.

After months of denials, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has just admitted to journalists at City Hall that he has smoked crack cocaine, according to multiple reports.

As you can see and hear below, Ford insisted that he is not an addict, but that he has used the drug, "Probably in one of my drunken stupors." He added that he wants to see the video now in police custody himself and would like "everyone in the city to see this tape."

Top image: Toronto Mayor Rob Ford appears on his weekly radio show November 3, 2013. Ford on Sunday urged his police chief to release a video shows him smoking crack cocaine and issued an apology for unspecified "mistakes" in his past. (REUTERS/Fred Thornhill)

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