The most heart-warming thing you'll see this afternoon.

The whole world is tuning in to one of the most elaborate Make-A-Wish scenarios ever seen, as the city of San Francisco has turned into Batman's Gotham City and made a 5-year-old cancer patient into a superhero. The Make-A-Wish Foundation enlisted more than 7,000 volunteers, including local police, city officials, and the news media to help a young boy named Miles transformed himself into Batkid and the Bay Area into Gotham, for a day of adventure including some heroic "rescues."

The local ABC affiliate has been following Miles around the city and live streaming his day, which you can watch here. Citizens and friends have come out to cheer him on and many more folks are following along on Twitter, via the #SFBatKid hashtag and a couple of accounts set up just for the show. Even the President is involved:

Make-A-Wish put together a stunningly large production for Miles, including "battles" with Batman's notorious enemies the Riddler and the Penguin; a couple of "damsel in distress" rescues, and a trip to the mayor's office to receive the key to the city.

 KRON TV mapped out the feel-good itinerary last night:

The day began with the San Francisco Chronicle's front page transformation into the Gotham City Chronicle, sticking Miles to the top of the edition. The author of the article? None other than his jealous Marvel rival, Clark Kent.

Miles was then driven around the city in two custom Batmobiles, each emblazoned with their own Batman symbol. 

The event even brought out some specially-made Twitter accounts, such as The Penguin's San Francisco account, which posted the photo below:

Miles was then driven around the city in two custom Batmobiles, each emblazoned with their own Batman symbol.

The event even brought out some specially-made Twitter accounts, such as The Penguin's San Francisco account, which posted the photo below:

San Francisco didn't totally transform into Gotham, though. For Miles, the day ends with a key to the city made of Ghiradelli chocolate, a local non-comic book favorite. Why be so serious when you can enjoy Miles' smiles?

(Top image of Batkid and Batman from Patricia Wilson via Twitter. Image of Batkid from AP. Image of Batmobiles from ABC News. Image of Batmobiles from ABC7 News.)

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Eric Levenson
Eric Levenson

Eric Levenson is a former staff writer for The Wire.

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