You asked. Mayors answered.

Last month, we put this question to Cities readers: What would you ask a mayor, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

The questions we posed to them, based on your suggestions, ranged from how mayors approach their jobs to their biggest frustrations to their wildest hopes for the future.

Over the next eight weeks, we'll be sharing the results. Episode One is below. Enjoy!

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