When it comes to social media at the municipal level, not everyone is a Cory Booker.

Do mayors write their own Twitter feeds, or is it actually a member of their staff? Turns out, it really depends on the mayor.

Last month, we put this question to Cities readers: What would you ask, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

The questions we posed to them, based on your suggestions, ranged from how mayors approach their jobs to their biggest frustrations to their wildest hopes for the future. In Episode 3, we get to the bottom of their varying social media strategies.

Don't miss Episodes One and Two, and stay tuned for more Ask a Mayor videos in the coming weeks.

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