Associated Press

And he still faces a civil lawsuit.

Former San Diego mayor Bob Filner was sentenced to three years of probation on Monday, on three counts of mistreating women, one of which was a felony. The 71-year-old politician, who served in Congress for two decades, avoided jail time under a plea agreement with prosecutors. 

At the hearing, Filner apologized to his family, staff, former constituents, and to the women he harassed. "Certainly the behaviors before this court today will never be repeated," he said in a very brief statement, citing the treatment regiment he entered into shortly before his resignation from office. 

Under the plea deal, Filner will spend three months in home confinement, starting at the beginning of 2014. He will lose his pension credit since the time of the first offense in March. As part of the agreement, Filner will be unable to seek public office again. None of the women involved in the charges against Filner wanted to give an impact statement during the sentencing hearing. Instead, a statement was read on their behalf. 

Before his resignation on August 30, Filner had been accused of misconduct and inappropriate behavior by at least 18 women. He was later charged with a felony false imprisonment for forcefully restraining a woman at a fundraiser earlier this year. The two misdemeanor charges related to accusations of kissing a woman without her consent, and groping a woman's backside during a photo op. Filner pleaded guilty to those charges on October 15th.

According to the probation report described by the Los Angeles Times, Filner is "a hard-driving perfectionist with an abrasive manner and a patronizing, retrograde attitude toward women." The report argues that, facing pressure from his job as mayor, Filner stopped taking "mood stabilizing medication, leading to the aggressive behaviors detailed in the charges. He is now regretful of those actions. 

The former mayor still faces a civil lawsuit, filed by Filner's former communications director Irene McCormack Jackson.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a high-speed train in Switzerland
    Transportation

    The Case for Portland-to-Vancouver High-Speed Rail

    At the Cascadia Rail Summit outside Seattle, a fledgling scheme to bring high-speed rail from Portland to Vancouver found an enthusiastic reception.

  2. photo: a woman on an electric scooter
    Transportation

    Why Aren’t More Women Riding Electric Scooters?

    Most users of micromobility devices like dockless scooters and e-bikes are young men. Fixing that gender gap may take more than just adding safety features.

  3. A sign outside a storefront in Buffalo, New York.
    Environment

    Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

    The Western New York city possesses a distinct mix of weather, geography, and infrastructure that could make it a potential climate haven. But for whom?

  4. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  5. A photo-illustration of a county map of the U.S.
    Maps

    I Used This Map to Find a Happy Childhood

    I was haunted by painful memories of growing up. But when I started tracking every county I’d ever visited, I found a better way of seeing my past.

×