Favorites to win in Brazil this June, the team will reside in a new, remote beach hotel for the tournament.

Germany's national soccer club, favored by many to win this year's World Cup, is not messing around with their accommodations for next June's tournament.

Dissatisfied with Brazil's hotel inventory, the team has decided to instead build a new beach resort as their home base. Financed by a Munich entrepreneur, "Campo Bahia" will have 14 two-story homes for players and team officials, a soccer field, and a media center by the time it finishes construction this spring. It'll be the first time the squad will have its own World Cup facility built from scratch, according to Der Spiegel.

The team will be doing a lot of travel no matter where they stay, with their first round matches in Salvador, Fortaleza and Recife. The rather remote location doesn't seem so bad when you take into account each match will be less than two hours away by plane.

Even though Campo Bahia is brand new, built by Germans, and soccer-centric, the team says it's not being built specifically to accommodate them. Once the World Cup ends it will become a sports and nature resort, including a youth soccer academy that'll partner up with a local orphanage. Until then, the German national team gets to spend their summer frolicking along a remote beach resort in-between games while inferior nations get stuck with Brazil's apparently inadequate hotels.

A security guard walks at the construction site where Germany's national soccer team will be based during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Santo Andre, 435 miles south of Bahia's capital Salvador December 14, 2013. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker)
A resident stands next to a banner depicting artist illustrations of the training centre for Germany's 2014 World Cup national soccer team to be constructed in Santo Andre. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker)
An aerial view of a ferry boat sailing at Joao de Tiba river in Santo Andre, December 14, 2013. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker) 
An aerial view of the construction of the site where Germany's national soccer team will be based during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Santo Andre, December 16, 2013. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker)
An aerial view of the site where a training centre for Germany's 2014 World Cup national soccer team will be constructed is seen in Santo Andre, December 16, 2013. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker) 
An aerial view of the construction of the site where Germany's national soccer team will be based during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Santo Andre, December 16, 2013. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker) 
An aerial view of Santo Andre beach where Germany's national soccer team will be based during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Santo Andre, December 16, 2013. (REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker) 

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