It has three car elevators. 

Twenty-two billionaires—just shy of two percent of the world's total—have purchased units in a condominium tower being built in Sunny Isles Beach, a small city in Miami-Dade County. The 60-story Porsche Design Tower features the normal super-rich perks, including units as large as 17,000 square feet, and swimming pool- and kitchen-equipped balconies as large as 1,600 square feet.  

But the real draw is hinted at in the name: The Porsche Design Tower features three car elevators that will take residents and their rides directly to their units, where they can park their car in a glass garage adjoined to their residences (two-car garages for the "cheaper" units, four-car garages for the pricier ones). This feature allows car-obsessives to stare at their super expensive cars from their high-rise living rooms. 

The tower, which broke ground in April 2013 and secured a massive construction loan in October, is the brainchild of car enthusiast and condo magnate Gil Dezer and Germany's Porsche Design Group. As of mid-October, Dezer had sold almost 100 of the tower's 132 units, the prices for which range from $4.2 million to $32 million. He reportedly spent part of November selling the remaining units at a gathering for Bugatti owners. There will be 284 robotic parking spaces in all. This is automated parking taken to the next level.  

The tower won't be ready for move-in until 2016. For now, all we have are some crazy design mock-ups courtesy of the developers: 

"You have such tall ceilings! And there's a car in your living room!"
Balcony swimming pool? Check. (Also, you can look at your cars through the window!)
How long do you think lines will be to use the car elevator? 
Wow! Such glass. 
The silent guest at every meal. 

The names of the condo's buyers are hush-hush for now. (Most of them have purchased through LLCs.) As of October, the $560 million condo had done $535 million in sales

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