Associated Press

He'll be calling in to Washington, D.C.'s crude "The Sports Junkies" show.

Other than saving taxpayers money and a really good party, there is nothing embattled Toronto Mayor Rob Ford publicly admits to loving more than sports. Especially football. 

Playing it, coaching it, watching it, Ford is all about the pigskin. He even likes to wear football gear while talking about drug use and oral sex with city hall reporters. So he's really going to fit right in when he makes his sports radio debut on the Washington, D.C.-based "The Sports Junkies" radio show.

Yes, the now nearly powerless mayor of Toronto, who has admitted to smoking crack and drinking to excess while steadfastly denying that he has a substance abuse problem, is slated to hop on the D.C. airwaves this Thursday at 8:40 a.m., WJFK 106.7.

The appearance was originally reported by many publications to be a recurring weekly gig, where Ford would share his predictions for each week's upcoming NFL games along with other sports takes (frequently spotted at Maple Leaf games, it's safe to assume Ford would also like to discuss hockey). But the Washington Post's Dan Steinberg is now reporting that Ford is only slated to appear on air this week. At least for now. “If it goes well, we’d love to have him weekly, but it’s just a one-time thing at this point,” WJFK's station director told Steinberg. 

Hosted by a foursome of truly obnoxious D.C.-area natives, "The Sports Junkies" are an almost perfect match for Ford should he become a regular. They're hardly loved by serious sports fans but their conversations about women, pop culture, and themselves (not to mention the "Sundress Parties" and poker tournaments they host) have won over the crucial "bro" demographic in Washington. Their crude brand of radio ("I have listened to them ONCE in my life, and all they talked about was how much toilet paper they needed to clean themselves," says one contributor on this Washington Capitals message board) should blend nicely with Ford's filter-free style.

With his Toronto-based radio and TV shows cancelled, this could be Ford's last chance to pad his résumé in the event he loses reelection next October. Ford's sports takes could also bring in a more diverse range of listeners for the Junkies. Or they could just have him help judge one of their bikini contests. The possibilities are endless.  

Top image: Toronto Mayor Rob Ford eats during the first half of an NFL football game between the Atlanta Falcons and the Buffalo Bills on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013, in Toronto. (AP Photo/Gary Wiepert)

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