Mayors address their worst cultural stereotypes.

Phoenix is a waterless maw of sprawl, everyone in Nashville wears cowboy boots, and the entire population of Portland, Oregon, dreams about, well, you know.

When we think about the culture of certain cities, it can be easy fall back on broad stereotypes. So how do the mayors of those cities explain to outsiders what they're really all about?

Last month, we put this question to Cities readers: What would you ask, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

In Episode 6, three mayors tackle the most persistently wrong ideas about their cities.

Don't miss Episodes One, Two, Three, Four, and Five, and stay tuned for more Ask a Mayor videos in the coming weeks.

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