Mayors address their worst cultural stereotypes.

Phoenix is a waterless maw of sprawl, everyone in Nashville wears cowboy boots, and the entire population of Portland, Oregon, dreams about, well, you know.

When we think about the culture of certain cities, it can be easy fall back on broad stereotypes. So how do the mayors of those cities explain to outsiders what they're really all about?

Last month, we put this question to Cities readers: What would you ask, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

In Episode 6, three mayors tackle the most persistently wrong ideas about their cities.

Don't miss Episodes One, Two, Three, Four, and Five, and stay tuned for more Ask a Mayor videos in the coming weeks.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

    American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

  2. A photo of the interior of a WeWork co-working office.
    Design

    WeWork Wants to Build the ‘Future of Cities.’ What Does That Mean?

    The co-working startup is hatching plans to deploy data to reimagine urban problems. In the past, it has profiled neighborhoods based on class indicators.

  3. An illustration of a private train.
    Transportation

    Let’s Buy a Train

    If you dream of roaming the U.S. in a your own personal train car, you still can. But Amtrak cuts have railcar owners wondering if their days are numbered.

  4. Design

    Cities Deserve Better Than These Thomas Heatherwick Gimmicks

    The “Vessel” at New York’s Hudson Yards—like so many of his designs—look as if the dystopian world of 1984 has been given a precious makeover.

  5. A photo of San Antonio's Latino High Line
    Equity

    A 'Latino High Line' Promises Change for San Antonio

    The San Pedro Creek Culture Park stands to be a transformative project for nearby neighborhoods. To fight displacement, the city is creating a risk mitigation fund.