Stealing is encouraged among mayors.

When is stealing an idea from a peer considered not just OK, but encouraged? When you're a modern city mayor, of course.

Last month, we put the following question to Cities readers: What would you ask, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

In Episode Eight, mayors shared the policy concepts they've borrowed from colleagues and peers in other cities, and how they've approached adapting or improving those ideas for their own cities.

Don't miss Episodes One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, and Seven, and stay tuned for a few final Ask a Mayor videos in the coming days.

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