On becoming a waste management and parking policy expert.

No one knows what it's really like to have a particular job until they have it, and the same goes for mayors.

Last month, we put the following question to Cities readers: What would you ask, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

In this final episode of our 2013 series, the mayors share the one thing about holding the top city office that they least expected.

Did you miss any of the earlier episodes? Catch up here.

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