Getting away from the job when you're always on the job.

Mayors may be high-ranking public officials, but they're nowhere near as sheltered from their constituents as say, a governor or a U.S. senator. A big part of a mayor's job is being visible and accessible in the very community they serve  — however awkward some of those encounters might be. So where can a mayor go to get away from it all?

Last month, we put the following question to Cities readers: What would you ask, if you could ask a mayor anything? Then we gathered a small group of mayors from across the country and around the world for a series of conversations.

In Episode Nine, we learn just how hard (or easy) it can be for mayors to find a spot to unplug.

Don't miss Episodes One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, and Eight, and stay tuned for one last Ask a Mayor installment before the New Year.

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