Canadians are not impressed with their hockey team's accommodations.

Canadian Twitter woke up this morning to this picture, of one of the rooms their men's hockey team will be staying in during the Winter Games in Sochi:

The photo, taken by Canadian Press writer Stephen Whyno, showed three small beds separated by nightstands. He later added that it's not the only room in the Olympic Village with three beds, nor is it any smaller than others.

But for a country that always expects Gold in hockey and really hates losing to Russia, the accommodations provoked quite a reaction.

But before any Russian conspiracies could take off, Whyno pointed to Pavel Lysenkov's video tour of a Russian Olympic team room. One less bed, but hardly more comfortable:

Canada's athletes are actually receiving some of the best accommodations in Sochi, according to an article Whyno later wrote for the Canadian Press. Thanks to their 14 gold medals in 2010, Canada's chef de mission Steve Podborski told CP, the country had extra leverage in room negotiations.

"That helped us a lot dealing with the Russians in terms of where we got to live in the buildings," adding shamelessly, "people love winners, that's what we are."

So Canucks won't be the only ones rearranging their beds or adjusting to modest amenities. These Austrian alpine skiers are looking extra cramped, but it's not stopping them from inviting a few people over to hang out:

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach) 

Even the big boss, IOC President Thomas Bach, won't live in luxury these next few weeks. He at least appears to not have a roommate:

(AP Photo/Pascal Le Segretain, Pool)

The athletes that end up with this room will have small beds and children's art to match: 

(AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

And yes, Russian athletes will have to suffer a similar interior design fate:

YouTube/PavelL76

Creepy art and small beds aside, the rooms in the Olympic Village are nowhere near as bad as what some press members covering the events are putting up with at their hotels right now. Not even close.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Perspective

    In a Pandemic, We're All 'Transit Dependent'

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  2. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  3. Equity

    What Bigotry Looks Like During Social Distancing

    As reports of harassment and assault against Asian Americans increase, community advocates are finding new ways to tackle the spread of xenophobia.

  4. photo: San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency employees turn an empty cable car in San Francisco on March 4.
    Transportation

    As Coronavirus Quiets Streets, Some Cities Speed Road and Transit Fixes

    With cities in lockdown and workplaces closed, the big drop in traffic and transit riders allows road repair and construction projects to rush forward.

  5. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

×