Including conspiracy, bribery charges, wire fraud, and money laundering.

A federal jury found former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin guilty of 20 counts of corruption and bribery on Wednesday, all but one of the 21 charges he faced. Nagin, a former two-term mayor of New Orleans, was accused of asking for personal favors in exchange for contracts with the city. 

NOLA.com has a good breakdown of the 21 charges, and what each one refers to. Nagin was found guilty of conspiracy, multiple bribery charges, multiple wire fraud charges, a money laundering conspiracy charge, and multiple charges of filing a false tax return. His only non-guilty charge pertains to an alleged $10,000 bribe from Rodney Williams. It took the jury less than 7 hours to reach its verdict. Prosecutors argued that Nagin received upwards of $500,000 in bribes, both before and after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city in 2005. 

Nagin will await sentencing free on bond, with some home detention provisions. The wire fraud charges carry a 20-year maximum jail sentence. According to the New York Times, he could possibly face more than 20 years in prison on these convictions, following federal guidelines for sentencing.

This post originally appeared on The Wire, an Atlantic partner site.

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