Thousands of 800-square foot apartments in 20 to 50-story towers.

The Bay Area’s housing shortage seems to be getting worse by the minute. But what if the tech companies could, in one sweeping move, take care of the whole problem?

In a series of new 3D visualizations, Berkeley designer Alfred Twu imagined what Silicon Valley would look like if tech giants replaced the parking around their headquarters with on-site housing. In order to accommodate all of the workers, Twu filled the campuses of Apple, Google, and Facebook with 20 to 50-floor towers, all filled with 800-square foot apartments.

Twu acknowledges that such high-density developments are not allowed under current zoning laws. Nevertheless, building more housing is a part of any solution going forward, and these visualizations give a clear sense of just how much is needed. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
All images courtesy of First Cultural Industries.

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