Associated Press

Russia's unarmed, heavily costumed guards may look intimidating, but their actual power is pretty limited.

In preparation for the Winter Olympics (on heightened alert after a string of bombings in Volgograd), 40,000 Russian troops and police have been deployed to Sochi to protect the region. Among the most notable are the hundreds of unarmed Cossacks on patrol.

Cossacks, native to parts of southern Russia and Eastern Europe, once served as paramilitary squads for Russian czars. They faced persecution under Soviet rule and largely disappeared from Russian culture during the 20th century.

With a conservative and nostalgic Kremlin today, they are gaining prominence again, seen by Putin and his supporters as representations of old-fashioned, egalitarian justice, "like cowboys in the United States or samurai in Japan," as the New York Times recently put it.

In the southern Krasnodar province (where Sochi is located), the presence of Cossacks comes with ethnic and religious tension. For one thing, they are associated with the regional expulsion of Circassians (a mostly Muslim ethnic group) in the 18th century. Even in 2012, over 1,000 Cossacks were put on patrol by regional governor Alexander Tkachev to help regulate what he saw as an uncontrollable influx of Muslims. Tkachev told law enforcement officers at the time, "what you can't do, the Cossacks can."

Though Cossacks can't legally carry a weapon, detain people or demand documents, they've been known to carry out vigilante justice. In a 2013 Times article about the group, one Cossack patrolman, Andrei Kovtun, said "this is what people are afraid of — that a Cossack will punish the culprit in the old, traditional but fair fashion."

In Sochi, Konstantin Perenizhko, a deputy to the regional Cossack military leader, tells Reuters that there will be 410 Cossacks on duty during the Games, patrolling with actual police at Olympic venues, train stations and the airport. Their presence, though intimidating, is mostly symbolic, and it's not clear how they could actually keep people safe. As Grantland's Louisa Thomas wrote earlier this week, "what that symbol is, and whom it's directed at, and why they’re there at all are questions without clear answers." 

With no eminent threat to be faced yet, the Cossacks, in their photogenic big hats and gray coats, have mostly added tourist appeal to Sochi.

Russian Cossacks board a bus in the early morning outside an Olympic housing complex at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Russian Cossacks enter a security checkpoint as preparations continue for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics in Rosa Khutor February 6, 2014. (REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth) 
Russian Cossacks patrol Sochi's airport in Adler January 31, 2014. Sochi will host the 2014 Winter Olympic Games from February 7 to 23. (REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk) 
A Russian Cossack stands near a board with mugshots of wanted people in the Adler district of Sochi January 22, 2014. (REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk) 
Russian Cossacks patrol near the Rosa Khutor Alpine Resort in Krasnaya Polyana near Sochi February 6, 2014. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria) 
Russian Cossacks patrol the streets as preparations continue for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics in Rosa Khutor February 6, 2014. (REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin)
Volunteers walk in front of Russian Cossacks who patrol the Adler district of Sochi, January 27, 2014. (REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a Google employee on a bicycle.
    Equity

    How Far Will Google’s Billion-Dollar Bay Area Housing Plan Go?

    The single largest commitment by a private employer to address the Bay Area’s acute affordable housing crisis is unique in its focus on land redevelopment.

  2. A person tapes an eviction notice to the door of an apartment.
    Equity

    Why Landlords File for Eviction (Hint: It’s Usually Not to Evict)

    Most of the time, a new study finds, landlords file for eviction because it tilts the power dynamic in their favor—not because they want to eject their tenants.

  3. Equity

    Berlin Will Freeze Rents for Five Years

    Local lawmakers agreed to one of Europe’s most radical rental laws, but it sets the stage for a battle with Germany’s national government.

  4. A map showing the affordability of housing in the U.S.
    Equity

    Minimum Wage Still Can’t Pay For A Two-Bedroom Apartment Anywhere

    The 30th anniversary edition of the National Low Income Housing Coalition report, “Out of Reach,” shows that housing affordability is getting worse, not better.

  5. photo of Arizona governor Doug Ducey
    Perspective

    Why FOMO Is the Enemy of Good Urban Mobility Policy

    Fear of Missing Out does not make good transportation policy. Sometimes a new bus shelter is a better investment than flashy new technology.

×