It's every little boy's wish come true.

Little kids have the ability to destroy entire worlds in their heads, but few can claim they've demolished a real-life building.

In that respect, Joe Mausser has bragging rights. The 6-year-old boy, who's coming off treatment for leukemia, got to push the button that exploded an old nursing school in Des Moines this weekend. He owes the awesome opportunity to his family, who bid on the kaboom-rights during a silent auction. Reports ABC5:

Friday morning, Joe and his brother Nick got the run down of how Sunday would work.

"There's like a big button and we push it at the same time and the building will blow up," said Joe Mausser.

They tinkered with wires and boxes and learned the phrase that will be the start of it all: "Fire in the hole!"

The construction engineers brought Joe a hard hat, construction vest and coat all in preparation for the big day.

The century-old structure at the Iowa Methodist Medical Center required more than 300 explosive-stuffed holes to demolish. The land it occupied will temporarily become green space before turning into more development. And here's the guy who made it all happen, pictured during the fundraising month of Movember:

Footage of the event:

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