It's every little boy's wish come true.

Little kids have the ability to destroy entire worlds in their heads, but few can claim they've demolished a real-life building.

In that respect, Joe Mausser has bragging rights. The 6-year-old boy, who's coming off treatment for leukemia, got to push the button that exploded an old nursing school in Des Moines this weekend. He owes the awesome opportunity to his family, who bid on the kaboom-rights during a silent auction. Reports ABC5:

Friday morning, Joe and his brother Nick got the run down of how Sunday would work.

"There's like a big button and we push it at the same time and the building will blow up," said Joe Mausser.

They tinkered with wires and boxes and learned the phrase that will be the start of it all: "Fire in the hole!"

The construction engineers brought Joe a hard hat, construction vest and coat all in preparation for the big day.

The century-old structure at the Iowa Methodist Medical Center required more than 300 explosive-stuffed holes to demolish. The land it occupied will temporarily become green space before turning into more development. And here's the guy who made it all happen, pictured during the fundraising month of Movember:

Footage of the event:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Maps

    Your Maps of Life Under Lockdown

    Stressful commutes, unexpected routines, and emergent wildlife appear in your homemade maps of life during the coronavirus pandemic.

  2. photo: an open-plan office
    Life

    Even the Pandemic Can’t Kill the Open-Plan Office

    Even before coronavirus, many workers hated the open-plan office. Now that shared work spaces are a public health risk, employers are rethinking office design.

  3. photo: The Pan-Am Worldport at JFK International Airport, built in 1960,
    Design

    Why Airports Die

    Expensive to build, hard to adapt to other uses, and now facing massive pandemic-related challenges, airport terminals often live short, difficult lives.

  4. photo: Social-distancing stickers help elevator passengers at an IKEA store in Berlin.
    Transportation

    Elevators Changed Cities. Will Coronavirus Change Elevators?

    Fear of crowds in small spaces in the pandemic is spurring new norms and technological changes for the people-moving machines that make skyscrapers possible.

  5. Life

    When the Cruise Ships Stop Coming

    As coronavirus puts the cruise industry on hold, some popular ports are rethinking their relationship with the tourists and economic benefits the big ships bring.

×