Associated Press

The Toronto mayor's never-ending saga.

New documents from the official investigation into Toronto's crack-smoking half-mayor Rob Ford were released by the courts on Wednesday, and the official description of the crack video obtained by police was revealed for the first time. 

The new documents released by an Ontario judge Wednesday so far do not deliver any earth-shattering or gut-busting new developments like past document dumps related to "Project Brazen 2." That's what the Toronto Police Department has called the investigation into Mayor Ford and his associates, which spun off a major drug-and-gun investigation. 

The biggest reveal to come from the latest document release is the description of the crack video obtained by police. Here is the official account of the video of Rob Ford smoking crack cocaine: 

The biggest question raised by this release is whether or not there are two videos of the mayor smoking crack. The police description includes little-to-no detail about the controversial banter between Ford and the people in the room described by Gawker and the Toronto Star in which he appeared to call a Canadian federal politician a "faggot." 

Another video obtained by police shows Mohammad Siad, the drug dealer accused of attempting to sell the crack video to Gawker and the Star, bragging about recording the mayor: 

One of the most interesting part of the documents, which have not been made fully available to the public yet (scanning takes time), seems to indicate where the police may be taking the still-ongoing investigation against the mayor:

The story of Canada's crack smoking mayor is far from over. Lawyers representing a cadre of Canadian newspapers are actively trying to convince the courts to unseal even more documents related to the Ford investigation. When today's release becomes available, we will post it here.

This post originally appeared on The Wire. More from our partner site:

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