Not all soccer fans can afford a swanky hotel by the beach. Property owners in some of Rio's slums are taking advantage.

This June's FIFA World Cup is expected to bring about half a million visitors to Brazil. With the tournament spread out among 12 different host cities, no one location will be overburdened with a sudden influx of soccer fans. 

In Rio de Janeiro, an international tourist spot already, the swank hotels with ocean views and rooftop pools may not fit every World Cup goer's budget. With that in mind, savvy property owners in some of the city's favelas have been busy converting their residential buildings into tourist accommodations.

Some have built hostels and bed and breakfasts. Others have converted extra bedrooms into a place they'll rent out during the event. According to Reuters, hotels in Rio are going from anywhere between $90 and $500 a night for the World Cup.

A room for rent is seen at the Maria Clara dos Santos home and hostel in the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro April 11, 2014. Picture taken April 11, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)
A lounge is seen at the Mirante do Arvrao hotel in the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 25, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)
Vicente Magalhaes prepares a room to be rented at his home in the Pereira da Silva slum in Rio de Janeiro April 1, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)
A man sits on a chair at a terrace of the Casa da Vera hostel in the Babilonia slum in Rio de Janeiro April 9, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)
Tourists look at a landscape at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro April 9, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)
A woman rests at a terrace of the Maria Clara dos Santos' house and hostel at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro April 11, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)

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