About 47 percent of the country is unoccupied.

There are plenty of visualizations based on population data, but nothing quite like what designer Nik Freeman has created: a map of where no one lives.

Using data from the 2010 U.S. census, Freeman shades green the nearly 5 million census blocks with zero population. The resulting map highlights the 47 percent of the U.S. that remains unoccupied.


Green shading represent unoccupied census blocks. Just one inhabitant is precludes the block from getting shaded. (Image courtesy of Nik Freeman)

In a blog post, Freeman explains that the shaded spots are uninhabited for two (largely unsurprising) reasons. The first is where it’s just physically difficult for people to live, i.e. rivers, swamps, mountains, and deserts. And the second is where we’re not allowed to, i.e. national parks and military bases.

(h/t The Washington Post/Know More

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