After last week's earthquake, residents of Iquique, Chile, traveled by foot to reach tsunami-proof higher land.

An earthquake struck Chile's Tarapacá region earlier this morning, registering a 5.2 on the Richter scale. It's the same region hit last week with the 7.6-magnitude earthquake that triggered a tsunami warning and series of aftershocks.

In the port city of Iquique, electricity and clean drinking water has been slow to return. Similar issues persist in Alto Hospicio, an impoverished town of 94,000 people, where thousands of homes were damaged. But Alto Hospicio is also 2,000 feat above sea level, making it a tsunami-proof refuge for people in Iquique.

The drive between the two cities is typically 20 minutes. But last week's seismic activity caused serious damage to the road that connects them, forcing the government to close it off to traffic. Residents instead reached friends and family in Alto Hospicio by foot, still using the highway but adding an extra two hours to their trip:

A woman poses for a picture for a friend (not pictured) while sitting on cracks on the road leading to Alto Hospicio commune, after a series of aftershocks, in the northern port of Iquique April 3, 2014. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado) 
People walk next to a crack along a damaged road leading to Alto Hospicio commune, after a series of aftershocks, April 3, 2014. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado) 
Residents push prams along a damaged road leading to Alto Hospicio commune, April 3, 2014. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado)
A man pushes his belongings along a damaged road leading to Alto Hospicio commune, April 3, 2014. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado)
A resident (C) jumps over cracks along a damaged road leading to Alto Hospicio commune, April 3, 2014. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado)  

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