Tatyana Fazlalizadeh created an ongoing public art series that actively addresses street harassment.

Fed up with her own street harassment, artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh created an ongoing public art series that actively addresses the issue. In her work, she interviews other women affected by the problem, paints their portraits, and then showcases the finished work on walls throughout the city. Fazlalizadeh says she started the project as a way to speak back to her harassers in the places where harassment happens. Visit Stop Telling Women to Smile to learn more about the project.

This film is produced by Dean Peterson.

Courtesy of Dean Peterson. This post first appeared on The Atlantic.

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