Whiz on this hotelier's property and risk being broadcast on YouTube.

Mikulov, a small Czech city along the Austrian border, is known for its wine-tasting tours. Here’s a warning, though: If you overindulge and nature calls, make sure to do your business in a restroom. One local hotel owner has reached his limit regarding dealing with public urinators. Stumble up to his hotel to relieve yourself, and while you might not get arrested, you may end up on YouTube.

(Twitter)

This creative warning sign recently placed in front of the Hotel Marcinčák is simple and brusque. Regardless of your native tongue—or how much wine you've tasted—you should get the message: Pee here and become world famous.

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