A man with a skateboard protesting Michael Brown's murder walks away from tear gas released by police on Aug. 17 in Ferguson, Missouri. Joshua Lott/Getty Images

There's a clear racial divide on faith in official inquiries regarding Michael Brown's shooting.

No matter how badly Missouri officials want to make Michael Brown's death—and the response to it by protesters and police in Ferguson—not about race, reactions to what has happened there over the last week are starkly racially divided.

A new survey from the Pew Research Center finds that white Americans have much more confidence than black Americans in the multiple government investigations into exactly what led up to the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown:

Similarly, while 65 percent of black respondents told Pew that they believe the police response to the shooting "has gone too far," only 33 percent of white Americans said the same. Explicit questions of race have Americans even more divided, with 37 percent of white respondents saying that the shooting "raises important issues about race," compared with 80 percent of black respondents.

The divide shows up even when you look at just who is paying attention to what's happening on the ground. Fifty-four percent of non-Hispanic black Americans say they followed news out of Ferguson last week very closely, compared with only 25 percent of non-Hispanic whites.

Protests and police crackdowns in Ferguson don't look likely to end anytime soon, with the National Guard moving in and more details on the shooting by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson slowly coming out. But one week in, a clear divide in how Americans view what happened there, and what could happen now in response, is obvious.

This post originally appeared on National Journal, an Atlantic partner site.

MORE FROM NATIONAL JOURNAL:

Vulnerable Incumbents Were Most Likely to Stray From Party Line This Congress

Jake Tapper on Ferguson Police: 'This Doesn't Make Any Sense.'

What a Getty Photographer Captured Before He Was Arrested in Ferguson

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a woman on a SkyTrain car its way to the airport in Vancouver, British Columbia.
    Transportation

    In the City That Ride-Hailing Forgot, Change Is Coming

    Fears of congestion and a powerful taxi lobby have long kept ride-hailing apps out of transit-friendly Vancouver, British Columbia. That’s about to change.  

  2. a photo of a man at a bus stop in Miami
    Transportation

    Very Bad Bus Signs and How to Make Them Better

    Clear wayfinding displays can help bus riders feel more confident, and give a whole city’s public transportation system an air of greater authority.

  3. Life

    Mapping the Changing Colors of Fall Across the U.S.

    Much of the country won’t see those vibrant oranges and reds until mid-October, which leaves plenty of time for leaf peepers to plan their autumn road trips.

  4. a photo rendering of "Siemensstadt 2.0" in Berlin
    Life

    Berlin's Take on a High-Tech ‘Smart City’ Could Be Different

    The German company Siemens is launching an ambitious adaptive reuse project to revitalize its historic corporate campus, with a modern data-collecting twist.

  5. Transportation

    Who Wins When a City Gets Smart?

    Last year, Columbus, Ohio, won a $50 million grant for high-tech transportation innovation, with a promise to help its most vulnerable families. Now some worry their needs are fading into the background.

×