Cube Cities lets planners and emergency responders know exactly how the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man (or a gas explosion) would affect a neighborhood. Cube Cities

A new visualization tool tells city planners and emergency personnel which buildings would be at risk during a catastrophic event.

Not long ago, there were some events cities just could not prepare for. The Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man devastating Manhattan, for example.

But today, this visualization by Cube Cities could tell NYC tell city planners and emergency personnel what buildings he would damage.

Cube Cities uses Google Earth and property data to predict how natural (and, apparently, supernatural) disasters might damage residential or commercial structures in North American cities. The company can even show how different floors on a particular building might be affected.

Cube Cities CEO Greg Angevine told FastCoDesign that disaster-management organizations could use these 3-D visualizations to prepare response teams—like the Ghostbusters.

(h/t Nerdist)

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