"Gotham City SF" is a brooding, dramatically scored montage of Bay life.

A while back, we were all so over time-lapse videos of cities. Then House of Cards happened, and it brought back the style with its iconic opening credits that show time sweeping through the U.S. capital with authority—carried by a score as powerful as Frank Underwood himself. A new time-lapse film attempts to create the same effect, but this time in San Francisco.

"Gotham City SF" is the creation of photographer Toby Harriman. The idea for the film came to him in 2012 after he became enthralled with a brooding, black-and-white, glossy style of cityscape photography he calls "Gotham." Since then he has collected the footage, edited it, and set it to a dramatic original cinematic score composed by James Everingham, a young U.K. composer (he was only 14 at the time!).

"This is my vision come to life after hours of setting up, shooting, and editing," Harriman writes in the film's introduction. "It is my art and my love for San Francisco, photography, and time-lapse."

The video seriously seems like the opening to a Ridley Scott movie in which a ruggedly handsome-but-tormented male protagonist defeats the villain and his inner demons by being a general badass. Watch it here:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a highway
    Transportation

    Americans Are Spending Billions on Bad Highway Expansions

    PIRG’s annual list of “highway boondoggles” includes nine transportation projects that will cost a total of $25 billion while driving up emissions.

  2. A photo of a cyclist on the streets of Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood.
    Equity

    Can Historic Preservation Cool Down a Hot Neighborhood?

    The new plan to landmark Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood aims to protect more than just buildings: It’s designed to curb gentrification.

  3. Brick apartment buildings in Stuyvesant Town, New York City
    Equity

    No Wonder Big Real Estate Is Fighting New York's New Rent Law

    Previously unreleased data shows that large landlords who own multiple buildings have a stranglehold over housing—and evictions—in New York City.

  4. A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.
    Life

    Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks at Night?

    Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

  5. Equity

    A Local Crisis Calls Pete Buttigieg Back to City Hall

    For all those nationally who’ve been dazzled by the mayor, the voters of South Bend aren’t satisfied with his response to a fatal police shooting last week.

×