Are they assembling furniture? Bowling? Partying on a weeknight? A new video reveals the truth.

Does this story sound familiar? It's 4:30 in the morning on a Wednesday. You're sound asleep—or, at least, you were a few minutes ago. Now, your bloodshot eyes are wide open and you're holding your head in your hands because your upstairs neighbor just decided that now would be the ideal time to put together that Ikea dresser.

Actually, never mind. They're definitely bowling. Yep, that's what they're doing. They have somehow built a bowling alley in their apartment and they are aiming for a perfect game and they won't stop until they get one.

Wait—that's not it either. You can hear other voices. A lot of them. Are they having a party? Are they having a flipping party at 4:30 in the morning on a weeknight when you have an important meeting in a matter of hours? What kind of monsters are these people? From what stratum of hell did they emerge?

This new video from the folks at Above Average gives us a much-needed glimpse into what is really going on in the apartment above yours. It's time to meet everyone's upstairs neighbors. Your ceiling is their stage, and they're dancing across it.

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