The Chicago White Sox bat against the Baltimore Orioles in the eighth inning of a baseball game in a nearly empty stadium on Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Baltimore. Due to security concerns the game was closed to the public. A state of emergency was declared Monday after riots erupted following the funeral of Freddie Gray. The Orioles won the game 8-2. AP Photo/Gail Burton

In a baseball first, no one was allowed to attend Wednesday's afternoon game in the city, rescheduled during a week of civil unrest.

Anyone who watched the Orioles in the early 2000s will remember weekday afternoon home games where it seemed like no one was in attendance. But today inside Camden Yards, the official attendance really was zero.

With the National Guard dispatched to Baltimore and the city still under a 10 p.m. curfew following riots Monday in response to the death of Freddie Gray, the Orioles moved their Wednesday evening game against the Chicago White Sox to 2 p.m. Not wanting to strain local safety resources in the middle of one the city's most violent weeks in decades, the Orioles closed the stadium to the public.

The game played to no fans is a Major League first, breaking a 133-year-old record of just six fans in attendance at a Worcester Worcesters' home game against the Troy Trojans on September 28, 1882.

A status board with "0" attendance is shown inside the press box at Oriole Park at Camden Yards as the Baltimore Orioles and Chicago White Sox played baseball on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 in Baltimore. The game was played in an empty stadium amid unrest in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray at the hands of police. (AP Photo/Daniel Gelston)

Inside Camden Yards, a couple of scouts could be seen in their seats, and a scattering of fans watched through the stadium's fence. The press box, however, was packed with curious media members excited to cover a baseball first and a new angle on this week's events in Baltimore.

In a week that has been upsetting for Baltimoreans, and with little closure over Gray's death to be found yet, today's disruption was an oddly amusing one. The Orioles won the game, 8-2.

More protests are scheduled for this weekend, and city officials have said they expect a police investigation into the death of Freddie Gray to be completed by Friday. The team will now fly to St. Petersburg, Florida, to play a weekend of "home" games against the Tampa Bay Rays that were originally scheduled to take place in Baltimore.

A National Guard vehicle passes outside Camden Yards before Wednesday's game. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

The team is sensitive to everything happening around them of late. "This is their cry," Orioles centerfielder Adam Jones said earlier today about Monday's riots. "This isn't a cry that is acceptable, but this is their cry and, therefore, we have to understand it."

Team manager, Buck Showalter refuses to look at this week's reschedulings as an inconvenience when so many people in the city are dealing with much worse. "We are citizens of this community," Showalter told the press after today's game. "And if something is going on here that creates this type of situation, it's a reflection on all of us, and we should look at it that way."

The Orioles' next game at Camden Yards is scheduled for May 11.

Baltimore Orioles right fielder Delmon Young fields a single by Chicago White Sox's Avisail Garcia in the second inning of Wednesday's baseball game in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Oriole Park at Camden Yards stadium, just before Wednesday's Orioles game against the Chicago White Sox. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Fans watch the game from outside of Camden Yards in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
A Baltimore Orioles employee drives a empty delivery vehicle through the stadium before Wednesday's game. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)
Baltimore Orioles' Everth Cabrera, bottom center, runs toward first base as he doubles in the first inning of Wednesday's game against the Chicago White Sox. Manny Machado scored on the play. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
A TV plays the Wednesday's game outside of Camden Yards. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  2. Equity

    Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

    The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

  3. Maps

    Mapping the Growing Gap Between Job Seekers and Employers

    Mapping job openings with available employees in major U.S. cities reveals a striking spatial mismatch, according to a new Urban Institute report.

  4. A photo of a design maquette for the Obama Presidential Center planned for Jackson Park and designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.
    Design

    Why the Case Against the Obama Presidential Center Is So Important

    A judge has ruled that a lawsuit brought by Chicago preservationists can proceed, dealing a blow to Barack Obama's plans to build his library in Jackson Park.

  5. Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation
    Equity

    Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

    Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.