An aerial view of tents setup by residents in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. Shelter, fuel, food, medicine, power, news, workers — Nepal's earthquake-hit capital was short on everything Monday as its people searched for lost loved ones, sorted through rubble for their belongings and struggled to provide for their families' needs. AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

Rescue efforts continue in Nepal's capital.

As night fell Monday in Kathmandu, the city was lacking in nearly every essential supply needed by the survivors of Saturday's 7.8 magnitude earthquake—the worst to hit Nepal since 1934.

Tens of thousands of people who have lost their homes or are afraid to return to them are now sleeping in tent cities set up around the capital. Kathmandu district chief administrator Ek Narayan Aryal reported that the aftershocks have made rescue work challenging, telling the press earlier today that "even the rescuers are scared and running because of them."

Congestion at Kathmandu's airport is slowing down foreign relief efforts, according to the BBC. The government's chief secretary, Lila Mani Poudyal, told the BBC earlier Monday that the country is still in need of "tents, dry goods, blankets, mattresses and 80 different medicines."

While survivors wait for aid to arrive, they're also looking for family and friends who are missing and cremating those who have been found dead. The AP reports that 90 percent of Nepal's army is now involved in search and rescue operations while local authorities are eager to dispose of the dead quickly in hopes of preventing the spread of disease.

Most local businesses are closed, with the Nepalese government declaring a weeklong period of recovery. Currently, some fruit vendors and pharmacies around the capital are open but one vendor told the AP that they're not expecting more shipments for "at least a week."

The death toll from Saturday's earthquake is now estimated to be over 3,800.

Damaged buildings lean to their sides in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Portraits and a wall clock is seen hanging on the remains of a house damaged in Saturday's earthquake in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)
Members of the Nepalese army walk through a damaged area caused by Saturday's earthquake, in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)
Nepalese residents carry belongings from their destroyed homes as they walk through debris of Saturday's earthquake, in Bhaktapur on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)
Nepalese villagers charge their cell phones in an open area in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
Locals read morning edition of a newspaper as they stand in the middle of a street in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
Nepalese queue at a gas station in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
A young girl walks with a boy over a collapsed school playground in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A man takes a selfie at the historic Dharahara Tower, a city landmark, that was damaged in Saturday’s earthquake in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
Locals take snapshots with their cell phones at the historic Dharahara Tower, a city landmark, that was damaged in Saturday’s earthquake in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
Hotel guests sleep at the lobby of Annapurna Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
A general view of the Basantapur Durbar Square that was damaged in Saturday’s earthquake in Kathmandu, Nepal, Sunday, April 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
Flames rise from burning funeral pyres during the cremation of victims of Saturday's earthquake, at the Pashupatinath temple on the banks of Bagmati river, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Sunday, April 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
A Hindu Nepalese woman offers prayers at Indrayani temple, that was damaged in Saturday’s earthquake, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015.  (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    The Obscure Tax Program That Promises to Undo America's Geographic Inequality

    A new tax incentive could carefully guide badly needed investment to America’s poorest places, or it could pour gasoline on markets that are already white hot.

  2. Maps

    Where Commuting Is the Worst

    Lack of affordable housing and sub-par mass transit are boosting the ranks of “super commuters” in some regions outside of pricey metros.

  3. New luxury condo towers rise on 'Billionaire's Row' in Manhattan.
    Life

    What Manhattan's Land Is Worth

    A new study traces the astonishing increase in the value of Manhattan’s land since 1950.

  4. A heavy layer of smog over Paris
    Environment

    How Much Are You 'Smoking' by Breathing Urban Air?

    A new app can tell you (and it’s not pretty).  

  5. Transportation

    Taxing Uber and Lyft to Fund Transit Isn't Fair to Transit

    Roads improvements are part of the regular budgeting process. Why not transit?