A demonstrator walks past police with a brick as they respond to thrown objects, Monday, April 27, 2015, after the funeral of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

15 police officers are reported injured in clashes with protesters Monday.

Law-enforcement helicopters circled over central Baltimore Monday afternoon as police clashed with civilians following the funeral for Freddie Gray. Pockets of juveniles hurled rocks, bricks, and other objects at officers in skirmishes across the city.

At least 15 police officers have been injured, according to a press conference held by city officials Monday evening. One of the officers was said to be unconscious and unresponsive. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake referred to the juveniles as "thugs."  

"Right now our focus is making sure the people of the community are safe, and our officers are safe," said Eric Kowalczyk, a spokesperson for the Baltimore Police Department, during a press conference earlier in the day. He added that the youths allegedly attacked police "with no provocation."

A boy throws a brick at a police van, Monday, April 27, 2015, during a skirmish between demonstrators and police after the funeral of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The scenes from Monday are markedly different from the largely peaceful rallies on Saturday, which were marked by only isolated clashes late in the evening. Live news footage showed people attacking several police vehicles, setting at least one on fire.

A few dozen individuals looted a CVS near Mondawmin Mall, a shopping center about three miles northwest of Penn Station. Other shops were looted over the course of the evening, in particular near Mondawmin Mall.

According to The Baltimore Sun, the violence today was steered by young people. High-school students, for the most part, allegedly inspired by a flier advertising a "purge" of police officers, assembled near the mall in mid-afternoon. Carrie Wells of The Baltimore Sun posted an image of the flyer that allegedly circulated among Baltimore students in advance of today's events. Officials at Baltimore City Public Schools did not immediately return a request for comment.

Police also released a notice today saying that members of three area gangs, the Bloods, Crips, and Black Guerrilla Family, had "entered into a partnership to 'take out' law enforcement officers." The release did not provide the source for this news.

A CBS reporter said during an on-air broadcast that a march had been planned from Mondawmin Mall to downtown—roughly the route being followed by crowds of demonstrators on Monday afternoon. Several major downtown businesses opted to close, including the University of Maryland, Baltimore, a city courthouse, and Lexington Market, the Sun reports.

Gray died on April 19 from a spinal-cord injury he allegedly received while in police custody. He was arrested without incident a week earlier. Gray asked repeatedly for medical treatment while in transit with police. His family attorney later reported that his spine was almost completely severed, and a medical examiner described the injury as "forceful trauma."

This post has been updated.

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