How a small neighborhood next to LAX slowly disappeared.

Manchester Square is a small neighborhood that borders Los Angeles International Airport. Over the last 15 years, airport officials have purchased properties in the area, razing houses as part of a plan to build a rental car parking lot. "You don't like to have to condemn people," Diego Alvarez, director of modernization and development for Los Angeles World Airports, tells filmmaker Kelly Loudenberg, "but that may be the reality if people don't want to sell to us."

In this short documentary, Loudenberg also interviews the neighborhood's few remaining residents about their uncertain futures. "I still see it as my neighborhood even though it's going away," Ethan Markosian, who has lived in Manchester Square since 1977, tells her.

This piece originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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