Patrick Semansky/AP

The decision followed reports on Saturday of drunk baseball fans taunting protesters.

Forty-five minutes out from the first pitch in Monday night's game between the Baltimore Orioles and the Chicago White Sox, officials in the front office at Camden Yards were still saying that the match-up was a go.

But as police streamed in to surround the ballpark, with reports of violent crowds edging closer to downtown, the Orioles finally made the call to postpone the game.

The team's management waited until the last possible moment to cancel the game, after reports emerged that Baltimore police had in fact already closed the gates to Camden Yards.

Given events near the ballpark on Saturday night, which inspired a lengthy series of tweets from team COO John Angelos in defense of the protestors, it's a surprise that the team didn't cancel or postpone the game earlier in the day on Monday.

When isolated demonstrators clashed with police on Saturday night, fans were required to remain in the stadium after the end of the game. Outside the ballpark, fans may have had a hand in exacerbating a tense situation. According to Baltimore City Paper's Brandon Soderberg, who reported live from near the ballpark, some intoxicated fans were taunting protesters.  

Monday's violent protests came in the immediate wake of funeral services for Freddie Gray, who died on April 19 from a spinal-cord injury he appears to have sustained while in police custody. But the Baltimore Sun has also reported that local high school students had been circulating a flier advertising a 3 p.m. "purge," a reference to the 2013 horror film The Purge, in which all laws are suspended for a single night.

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