Patrick Semansky/AP

The decision followed reports on Saturday of drunk baseball fans taunting protesters.

Forty-five minutes out from the first pitch in Monday night's game between the Baltimore Orioles and the Chicago White Sox, officials in the front office at Camden Yards were still saying that the match-up was a go.

But as police streamed in to surround the ballpark, with reports of violent crowds edging closer to downtown, the Orioles finally made the call to postpone the game.

The team's management waited until the last possible moment to cancel the game, after reports emerged that Baltimore police had in fact already closed the gates to Camden Yards.

Given events near the ballpark on Saturday night, which inspired a lengthy series of tweets from team COO John Angelos in defense of the protestors, it's a surprise that the team didn't cancel or postpone the game earlier in the day on Monday.

When isolated demonstrators clashed with police on Saturday night, fans were required to remain in the stadium after the end of the game. Outside the ballpark, fans may have had a hand in exacerbating a tense situation. According to Baltimore City Paper's Brandon Soderberg, who reported live from near the ballpark, some intoxicated fans were taunting protesters.  

Monday's violent protests came in the immediate wake of funeral services for Freddie Gray, who died on April 19 from a spinal-cord injury he appears to have sustained while in police custody. But the Baltimore Sun has also reported that local high school students had been circulating a flier advertising a 3 p.m. "purge," a reference to the 2013 horror film The Purge, in which all laws are suspended for a single night.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: Cranes on the skyline in Oakland, California
    Life

    How to Make a Housing Crisis

    The new book Golden Gates details how California set itself up for its current affordability crunch—and how it can now help build a nationwide housing movement.

  2. Life

    Why Amsterdam May Clamp Down on Weed and Sex Work

    Proposals to ban cannabis for tourists and relocate the red-light district would dramatically reshape the city’s anything-goes image.

  3. animated illustration: cars, bikes, scooters and drones in motion.
    Transportation

    This City Was Sick of Tech Disruptors. So It Decided to Become One.

    To rein in traffic-snarling new mobility modes, L.A. needed digital savvy. Then came a privacy uproar, a murky cast of consultants, and a legal crusade by Uber.

  4. photo: bicyclists in Paris during a transit strike in December.
    Transportation

    Paris Mayor: It's Time for a '15-Minute City'

    In her re-election campaign, Mayor Anne Hidalgo says that every Paris resident should be able to meet their essential needs within a short walk or bike ride.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×