Pew Research Center

A Pew map shows that, between 2000 and 2013, whites became the minority in 78 U.S. counties.

By 2040, the country's white population will no longer be the majority. But for many regions around the country, this demographic shift has already arrived. A new map created by the Pew Research Center pinpoints the 78 counties in 19 states where, from 2000 to 2013, minorities together outnumbered the white population.

Pew crunched Census numbers from the 2,440 U.S. counties that had more than 10,000 residents in 2013. Whites made up less than half the population in a total of 266 counties. Even though these 266 counties made up only 11 percent of the counties analyzed, they contained 31 percent of the country's total population, with many of them home to dense urban areas.

Most of these counties are sprinkled around the Sun Belt states in southern part of the country (below).

Of the 25 counties with the largest total populations, 19 now have non-white majorities. As of 2000, six of these (four in California and two in Florida) had white majorities. The most dramatic change within the last decade can be seen in counties in Georgia. The share of white residents in Henry County, for example, fell from 80 percent in 2000 to a little less than 50 percent in 2013.

Overall, while the white population is still the largest racial group in the United States (63 percent), its share is certainly declining—more rapidly in some parts of the country than others. In fact, only two relatively small counties—one in South Carolina and one in Louisiana—have gone from being majority-non-white to majority-white in the last decade.

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