State's Attorney for Baltimore City Marilyn J. Mosby, pictured on May 1, just before she announced probable cause for the arrest of six officers involved in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray. Adrees Latif/Reuters

On Thursday afternoon, the State’s Attorney for Baltimore City announced indictments against all six police officers involved in the April 12 arrest and subsequent death of Freddie Gray.

On Thursday afternoon, Marilyn J. Mosby, the State’s Attorney for Baltimore City, announced indictments against all six police officers involved in the April 12 arrest of Freddie Gray.

Earlier in the day, a grand jury produced indictments on all criminal charges presented to them. The charges, similar to those announced by Mosby on May 1, include manslaughter, assault, misconduct, and second-degree murder.

The six Baltimore City Police Department officers now face criminal charges in the death of Gray, who died on April 19 as a result of severe spinal injuries he allegedly sustained while in police custody. An independent investigation led by Mosby determined that there was no probable cause for his arrest in the first place.

Indictments of police officers are rare—usually because prosecutors do not seek them. In December, a jury failed to tender an indictment for Daniel Pantaleo, a New York Police Department officer who placed Eric Garner in a chokehold during an arrest. Garner later died. The month prior—in a case that set off nationwide protests—a grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson, a Ferguson Police Department officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, who was unarmed.

Arraignment for the police officers in Baltimore is scheduled for July 2. The maximum penalties for the charges vary in severity, from sentences of 3 to 30 years.

On May 8, attorneys for the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #3 filed a motion to dismiss all charges against the six officers or, barring that, recuse Mosby as prosecutor.

The death of Freddie Gray and the subsequent response from law enforcement—which critics described as a pre-emptive police overreaction—led to days of protests and one night of violence in Baltimore. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake placed the city on a curfew that stretched nearly a week.

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