State's Attorney for Baltimore City Marilyn J. Mosby, pictured on May 1, just before she announced probable cause for the arrest of six officers involved in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray. Adrees Latif/Reuters

On Thursday afternoon, the State’s Attorney for Baltimore City announced indictments against all six police officers involved in the April 12 arrest and subsequent death of Freddie Gray.

On Thursday afternoon, Marilyn J. Mosby, the State’s Attorney for Baltimore City, announced indictments against all six police officers involved in the April 12 arrest of Freddie Gray.

Earlier in the day, a grand jury produced indictments on all criminal charges presented to them. The charges, similar to those announced by Mosby on May 1, include manslaughter, assault, misconduct, and second-degree murder.

The six Baltimore City Police Department officers now face criminal charges in the death of Gray, who died on April 19 as a result of severe spinal injuries he allegedly sustained while in police custody. An independent investigation led by Mosby determined that there was no probable cause for his arrest in the first place.

Indictments of police officers are rare—usually because prosecutors do not seek them. In December, a jury failed to tender an indictment for Daniel Pantaleo, a New York Police Department officer who placed Eric Garner in a chokehold during an arrest. Garner later died. The month prior—in a case that set off nationwide protests—a grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson, a Ferguson Police Department officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, who was unarmed.

Arraignment for the police officers in Baltimore is scheduled for July 2. The maximum penalties for the charges vary in severity, from sentences of 3 to 30 years.

On May 8, attorneys for the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #3 filed a motion to dismiss all charges against the six officers or, barring that, recuse Mosby as prosecutor.

The death of Freddie Gray and the subsequent response from law enforcement—which critics described as a pre-emptive police overreaction—led to days of protests and one night of violence in Baltimore. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake placed the city on a curfew that stretched nearly a week.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A young girl winces from the sting as she receives the polio vaccine in 1954.
    Life

    How Mandatory Vaccination Fueled the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

    To better understand the controversy over New York’s measles outbreak, you have to go back to the late 19th century.

  2. A photo of a closed street in St. Louis
    Equity

    The Curious Tale of the St. Louis Street Barriers

    Thanks to an '80s mania for traffic calming, the St. Louis grid is broken by hundreds of bollards and cul-de-sacs. Critics say it’s time to get rid of them.

  3. Design

    A New Plan to Correct a Historic Mistake in Pittsburgh

    A Bjarke Ingels Group-led plan from 2015 has given way to a more “practical” design for the Lower Hill District. Concerns over true affordable housing remain.

  4. Life

    How to Inspire Girls to Become Carpenters and Electricians

    Male-dominated trades like construction, plumbing, and welding can offer job security and decent pay. A camp aims to show girls these careers are for them, too.

  5. People eat and drink coffee inside a small coffeehouse.
    Life

    Gentrification Is Hurting Kuala Lumpur's Iconic Coffee Shops

    Traditional kopitiams, which serve sweetened coffee in no-frills surroundings, are a part of Malaysian national identity, but their survival is precarious.