Scenes from Saturday's march and rally against police brutality.

More than a thousand demonstrators took part in a peaceful march and rally against police brutality in front of Baltimore City Hall Saturday afternoon. The rally followed Friday's announcement that six city police officers were to be arrested and charged in the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray. That night, at least 53 protesters were arrested, the Baltimore Sun reports, many for violating the city's 10 p.m. curfew, which has since been lifted.

Protesters walk through downtown Baltimore. The march began at the Gilmor Homes in Sandtown-Winchester, the west side Baltimore neighborhood where Freddie Gray grew up. (Josh Sisk/CityLab)
Curtis Brunache of Hyattsville, Maryland, and Ericka Campbell of Baltimore pass out lunches they assembled with donations from local stores such as MTD Bakery and Shoprite. In Campbell's words, they wanted to provide food for protesters, police and the National Guard. They assembled 1000 lunch bags. (Josh Sisk/CityLab)
Malik Shabazz of Black Lawyers for Justice, the organizers of Saturday's rally, addresses the crowd in front of Baltimore's City Hall. Among wide-ranging topics, he denied reports that he is a "bad man," told the crowd not to believe what they read in the Baltimore Sun or mainstream media, and warned the city of Baltimore not to harm State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby. (Josh Sisk/CityLab)
The crowd watches (and records) Maryland State Senator Catherine E. Pugh speak at Saturday's rally against police brutality in front of Baltimore's City Hall. (Josh Sisk/CityLab)
A recurring topic at the rally, both among speakers on the stage and those in the crowd, was this group in fatigues stationed across the street, believed to be a sniper team. (Josh Sisk/CityLab)
Broderick Bodie of Baltimore, A.J. (no last name given) and Zion Hameed from Harford County, show off the signs they made. When asked why they came down to the rally today, Broderick said he wanted to help "stop the police from killing teens," and A.J. said he was there to "support my people, support the cause, and support everyone." (Josh Sisk/CityLab)

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